Undergraduate / Graduate

FOOD: Projects in Bio-Art

FID-3644-A
Thursday 3:00-8:50
Fall semester: 3 studio credits
Instructor: Suzanne Anker

You are what you eat or are you? Do you know what is in your food? From farm to fork what happens in between? This course focuses on how food production, industrial farming, and GMO’s have become part of our daily life. Projects will consists of growing plants hydroponically, DNA analysis of local food, and microscopic imaging of foodstuffs. In addition we will explore the cultural differences, taboos and evolution of eating practices. We will look at the culinary styles around the world, their social, economic and political ramifications. We will introduce projects in urban farming and molecular cuisine as well as field trips to diverse restaurants. Part forensics, part horticulture we will gather plants to extract pigments for watercolor, and design food sculptures. We will explore the effect microorganisms have on food, from cheese to e-coli, to yogurt. Performance, painting, sculpture, public art, photography, illustration and cartooning, as well as community-based projects are welcome.

Urban Botanicals

FDD-2216-A
Fall semester: 3 credits
Friday: 12:00-2:50
Instructor: Gary Sherman

This class will visit local sites in search of urban botanicals from which to draw creative inspiration. We’ll explore micro and macro environments, the fractal realm of self-similarity and symmetry. We’ll see how the nature/nurture dialectic has been exploited by artists, and look to the less obvious lichens, molds and mosses as alternatives to the more ornamental botanicals. To meet the countless challenges that botanicals present, students will explore various mediums to create drawings/collages that range from the simple to the complex.

Anatomy I

Fall semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

This course offers a “bones up” approach to learning anatomy. By starting with the skeleton, the student will learn about and internalize the structure, form and movement of the body in an effort towards making more informed and intelligent drawings of the live model. A portion of the class will be focused on the comparative anatomy of animals. Materials for the majority of the class will consist of pencil or charcoal and paper.

Course #                 Day         Time

FDD-2020-A         M              9:00-11:50
FDD-2020-B         M              12:00-2:50
FDD-2020-C         Tu             9:00-11:50

Anatomy II

Spring semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

This course offers a “bones up” approach to learning anatomy. By starting with the skeleton, the student will learn about and internalize the structure, form and movement of the body in an effort towards making more informed and intelligent drawings of the live model. A portion of the class will be focused on the comparative anatomy of animals. Materials for the majority of the class will consist of pencil or charcoal and paper.

Course #                 Day         Time

FDD-2025-A         M              9:00-11:50
FDD-2025-B         M              12:00-2:50
FDD-2025-C        Tu             12:00-2:50

Fur, Feathers, and Scales: Comparative Animal Anatomy

FDD-2041
Tuesday 12:00-2:50
Fall semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

Tracing the animal kingdom from jellyfish to insects to humans, students will gain a working knowledge of comparative animal anatomy. The focus will be on vertebrates (reptiles, birds, and mammals) and the morphological differences which constitute groups, families, and individual species. There will be discussions on ecology, evolution, and the depiction of animals throughout art history. Students will work from specimens from the SVA Nature and Technology Lab, on location drawings, and photos.

From the Laboratory to the Studio: Practices in Bio Art

FID-3437-A
Wednesday 3:00-8:50
Spring semester: 3 studio credits

Instructor: Suzanne Anker

From the decipherment of the human genome to industrialized food production, science has spilled out of the laboratory into our lives. As scientists engage in molecular engineering, the corporeal body and the manipulation of life forms have become a public and aesthetic discourse unto themselves. This course will examine intersections between laboratory practices and visual art production. Projects will employ video microscopes and scanning devices, scientific specimen collections, plant tissue engineering, new anatomical models and molecular cuisine. In addition, each student will design their own terrarium with fish, aquatic plants and/or micro eco-systems. Field trips and guest lecturers will complement course material. Students may work in a variety of media, from drawing and painting to the digital and performing arts.

Prometheus Unbound: An Introduction Bio Art

FID-3432-A
Wednesday 3:00-8:50
Fall semester: 3 studio credits
Instructor: Brandon Ballengée

Humans have tampered with species development for thousands of years, creating countless varieties of domesticated plants and animals. Today, advances in biotechnology allow for the creation of entirely novel life forms such as transgenic rats glowing with jellyfish genes. In this lab/studio course, students will be introduced to the emerging field of biological arts through hands-on laboratory practices, discussions and excursions. Field trips to local pet stores and seafood markets will be conducted to examine post-natural organisms. In the lab/studio, students will create a post-naturalist journal, extract DNA, paint with stained tissues, culture microbial fauna paintings, generate and disperse native seed bombs, and learn proper techniques for preserving vertebrates, among other activities. Topics of discussions will range from bio-ethics to science-fiction/biological reality, and more.