All posts by AdminFA

Biotransmutations

Biotransmutations / Open Studios

Biotransmutations

Thursday June 15, 2017
6-9 pm

SVA BFA Fine Arts
335 W 16th St.
10011, New York.

Exhibition / Open Studios featuring work by current students of the SVA Bio Art Summer Residency.

Carolyn Angleton, Reid Arowood, Shuyi Cao, Maria Cau Levy, Tessa Ho, Alejandro De Las Noches, Sabrina Merayo Nuñez, Juliana Peloso, Tarah Rhoda, Masha Semenenko, Mark Woodbridge.

Biodesign Challenge: Info sessions

 

Join the SVA NYC Team

http://biodesignchallenge.org/

Collaborate with an ambitious group of SVA students and alumni to create an innovative project inspired by biology. No previous experience necessary and all skill sets appreciated!

Contact us at [email protected] for more info. Join us on February 28th or March 2nd at 3PM at the SVA Bio Art Lab (335 W 16th Street, 3rd floor) for an information session! Alumni welcome.

The Biodesign Challenge offers art and design students the opportunity to envision future applications of biotechnology in a competition that highlights student work. Our organizers connect classrooms with a team of biologists and experts to guide the students as they develop their ideas. Students in the Biodesign Challenge explore how to harness these advancements for ourselves and the natural world, how these new applications function, and how they augment our lives and environment.

The winning teams are invited to MoMA to showcase their designs in front of members the academic, industrial, and design communities at the Biodesign Summit in June 2017.

 

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ASM’s Agar Art 2017 Contest

Create a Microbial Masterpiece for ASM’s Agar Art 2017 Contest!

The American Society for Microbiology
IN PARTNER WITH
The School of Visual Arts, Genspace and the DNALC

ASM AGAR ART 2017 Contest Microbial Masterpiece
A 2 Part Workshop with Nurit Bar-Shai & Christine Marizzi

When: Friday Feb 3 & Sunday Feb 5, 2017, 3-6pm

Where: School of Visual Arts, Fine Arts Department
335 West 16th St. New York, NY 10011

Hosted and Sponserd by School of Visual Arts | Fine Arts Department

Eventbrite Registration

 

Agar-Competition

Ever wanted to paint with life? SVA is proud to offer you access to the American Society for Microbiology’s Agar Art contest. Create your own work of art using microbes as “paint” and agar as a “canvas.”  No experience necessary! In this two part, hands-on workshop, you will create your own Agar Art using live microbes. Photos of the Agar Art created in this workshop are eligible to enter the American Society of Microbiology contest. Media outlets in 12 countries, from Discovery to BBC News to The Huffington Post, featured coverage of the previous competitions and its winners. In addition, participants can win up to $485-worth of prizes.

PART 1: 02/03/17 Friday 3PM-6PM
Participants will create Agar Art by painting with microbes and learn how to use traditional biology lab techniques with artistic tools. A team of trained staff and PhD level scientist will hold an in-depth teaching session and discussion about the microbes you used in your Agar Artwork, about the human microbiome and about genetic engineering biotechnology used to modify bacteria colors.

PART 2: 02/05/17 Sunday 3PM-6PM
After incubation, participants will return to the SVA Bio Lab to observe the now visible bacterial paintings. Lab assistants will introduce a variety of post-production techniques to refine and edit the designs. The final works will be photographed and submitted to the ASM Agar Art contest.

Register

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/create-a-microbial-masterpiece-for-asms-agar-art-2017-contest-tickets-31191489585

 

Organizers and Instructors:
Nurit Bar-Shai, Co-Founder Genspace
Christine Marizzi PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s DNA Learning Center

In collaboration with The School of Visual Arts
Hosts and Sponsors: Fine Arts Department, School of Visual Art
Suzanne Anker, Chair Fine Arts Department
Tarah Rhoda, Bio Art Lab Manager

The workshop is devised in association with American Society for Microbiology
Katherine S. Lontok, PhD, ASM Public Outreach Manager

Partners:
School of Visual Art, Fine Arts Department, Bio Art laboratory
Genspace Community Biotech Lab, Brooklyn NY 
DNA Learning Center, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Supported by:

 Agar Art logo

American Society for Microbiology

Genspace

SVA NYC

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

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Bio Art in the Mysterious World of the Microbes

Microbes represent the most diverse group of organisms on earth and have been found throughout the world to the far reaches of the planet. They are capable of living in places we once thought were uninhabitable from the deep sea hydrothermal vents to the ice masses of the artic tundra. These microorganisms are capable of eating petroleum, metals, acids, plastics, and toxic wastes and are thus valuable in the process of removing pollutants and contaminants from our environment. Here, we take a bio art approach to discovering new species within the microbial world. We will visualize and image the wonderful beauty of these fascinating creatures by studying their many shapes and morphologies that often take the form of rods, spheres, coils and helixes. We will use a variety of collecting techniques to obtain these microbes from the waterways throughout and surrounding Manhattan. We will use sophisticated culturing techniques in the SVA Bio Art Lab and state-of-the-art techniques, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to identify the microbes we collect. Through this process we will study bioluminescent diatoms, cyanobacteria, protozoans like amoebas and paramecium, zooxanthellae the symbiotic algae that live inside coral polyps, and many others. Come collaborate on an adventure of art and science and dive into the mysterious world of microbes.

Biological Imaging: The Use of Microscopy to Observe and Photograph Life

Saturday
3:00PM – 6:00PM
Jan 28 – Mar 04
1.50 CEUs, 6 Sessions
$220

Instructor: Joseph A. DeGiorgis, PhD
BFA Fine Arts
School of Visual Arts
[email protected]

Capturing images of nature and biological phenomena is an essential component of the scientific process; it is also an intricate aspect of art. In this course we will utilize macro lenses and dissecting stereo microscopes, as well as compound and fluorescent microscopes to obtain images of the microscopic world. Students will photograph marine invertebrates, including sea urchins, starfish, tunicates, comb jellies, anemones and sponges. Under the high-mag objective, we will image zooplankton and phytoplankton from marine and freshwater samples, and tissues prepared with our hands for microscopic observations. Students will develop a portfolio of images through projects that can include still life, video, time-lapse imaging, stereo pairs of 3D images, focal stacking and high-dynamic range photography. See what you can discover under magnification.

Biological Imaging: The Use of Microscopy to Observe and Photograph Life

Saturday
3:00PM – 6:00PM
Mar 18 – Apr 22
Location To Be Announced
1.50 CEUs, 6 Sessions
$220

Instructor: Joseph A. DeGiorgis, PhD
BFA Fine Arts
School of Visual Arts
[email protected]

Capturing images of nature and biological phenomena is an essential component of the scientific process; it is also an intricate aspect of art. In this course we will utilize macro lenses and dissecting stereo microscopes, as well as compound and fluorescent microscopes to obtain images of the microscopic world. Students will photograph marine invertebrates, including sea urchins, starfish, tunicates, comb jellies, anemones and sponges. Under the high-mag objective, we will image zooplankton and phytoplankton from marine and freshwater samples, and tissues prepared with our hands for microscopic observations. Students will develop a portfolio of images through projects that can include still life, video, time-lapse imaging, stereo pairs of 3D images, focal stacking and high-dynamic range photography. See what you can discover under magnification.

Botanica: Imaging the Green Planet

BFA Fine Arts
School of Visual Arts
[email protected]

Plants are among the most diverse organisms on the planet, growing in arid deserts and rain forests, on mountaintops and in the savannahs, as well as in marshes, lakes, rivers and the seas. They can take on beautiful forms with vivid colors and highly evolved features. While they are often thought of as almost inert objects, they can exhibit elaborate behaviors such as opening their blossoms at dawn, tracking the sun as the earth rotates, or baiting and trapping insects as a source of food. In this course, we will capture photographic representations of these lush life forms and explore the beautiful and bizarre world of plants and take an in-depth look at the intricate composition of their sexual structures, roots, vascular tissues and the photosynthetic machinery that create these primary producers. In particular, we will use time-lapse imaging to capture their movements, macro lenses to obtain images of their details, and microscopes to image tissues and cells. The fun begins as we focus on these unrelenting worshipers of the sun.

Botanica: Imaging the Green Planet

Sunday
11:00AM – 2:00PM
Mar 19 – Apr 23
Location To Be Announced
1.50 CEUs, 6 Sessions
$220

Instructor: Joseph A. DeGiorgis, PhD
BFA Fine Arts
School of Visual Arts
[email protected]

Plants are among the most diverse organisms on the planet, growing in arid deserts and rain forests, on mountaintops and in the savannahs, as well as in marshes, lakes, rivers and the seas. They can take on beautiful forms with vivid colors and highly evolved features. While they are often thought of as almost inert objects, they can exhibit elaborate behaviors such as opening their blossoms at dawn, tracking the sun as the earth rotates, or baiting and trapping insects as a source of food. In this course, we will capture photographic representations of these lush life forms and explore the beautiful and bizarre world of plants and take an in-depth look at the intricate composition of their sexual structures, roots, vascular tissues and the photosynthetic machinery that create these primary producers. In particular, we will use time-lapse imaging to capture their movements, macro lenses to obtain images of their details, and microscopes to image tissues and cells. The fun begins as we focus on these unrelenting worshipers of the sun.

The Biophilia Hypothesis

2016-bio-design-challenge-sva-exhibition-008

September 17 – October 15 2016
Curated by: Suzanne Anker

Opening reception: Wednesday, September 21, 2016. 6-8pm

Location: SVA Flatiron Gallery
133/141 West 21st Street
Tel: 212.592.2145
[email protected]

 

School of Visual Arts presents “The Biophilia Hypothesis,” an exhibition of work by BFA Fine Arts students. Curated by department chair Suzanne Anker, “The Biophilia Hypothesis” is on view Saturday, September 17, through Saturday, October 15, at the SVA Flatiron Gallery, 133/141 West 21st Street, New York City.

The Biophilia Hypothesis, formulated by eminent biologist and author E.O. Wilson, reflects on the love of living forms. Why do people have pets, houseplants or gardens? What is it about life forms that are so intriguing and vital? As humankind moves into the Anthropocene, our biochemical natures and cosmological understandings require sustainable strategies. This exhibition brings together a collaborative project entitled MyoTomato* in which speculations concerning the insertion of myoglobin (protein found in animals) into a tomato is a way to sustain the environment. This art/science project was presented at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City as part of the Bio Design Challenge. http://biodesignchallenge.org

The exhibition also includes work by Steph Mantis, which explores the different forms and colors of flavor extracts; Mingyi Yan creates stunning chemical gardens reminiscent of geological formations; Darya Warner’s work speaks to microscopic worlds while Leah Xie’s flower installation is an ode to the interconnections of matter.

Curated by Suzanne Anker, this exhibition continues to interweave Science and Technology into the Fine Arts Program at SVA. Please visit the Bio Art Lab at http://bioart.sva.edu.

Participating artists Leman Akpinar, Viktorea Benois, Sebastian Cocioba, Andrew Cziraki, David Hanlon, Marguerite Li, Bo Liu, Steph Mantis, Kirin Pino, Shannon Pollak, Gina Proenza, Tarah Rhoda, Victor Taboada, Darya Warner and John Patrick Wells.

 

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Lecture by Avi Lubin

gideon-gechtman-white-peacock

The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths

Lecture by Avi Lubin

Wednesday September 14, 2016. 4PM
Free and open to the Public

School of Visual Arts
SVA Bio Art Lab
BFA Fine Arts Department
335 West 16th Street, 3th Floor
New York, NY – 10011

This talk will present the work of Israeli artists whose works offer an interesting and unique dialogue between art and science.

Avi Lubin is an independent curator and the head of theory studies at the Postgraduate Fine Art Program, Hamidrasha College of Art. He is the founding co-editor of Tohu Magazine, a trilingual independent online art publication (published in Hebrew, Arabic and English). Lubin is a PhD candidate at the School of Philosophy and The Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas at the Tel Aviv University

Image: Gideon Gechtman, White Peacock, 1999, Mixed Media.

Microscopy Under a Hurricane: Uncovering the Tiny Life of Bonaire

COME JOIN US IN BONAIRE !!!

July 30th – August 6th, 2016

microscopy under a hurricane

Beneath the hurricane belt of the central Caribbean lays the windswept island of Bonaire famed for its brilliant coral reefs, magnificent mangroves, and flocks of pink flamingoes. In this expedition, we bring our microscopes, SCUBA gear, and collecting nets to photograph this tropical wonderland and the tiny creatures that live above and below the waters surface. Along the way we will paddle our kayaks through the blue waters of the island coast, visit the sea-salt mines, and search out birds of paradise. We will scan the sea for bioluminescence and stargaze into the soft Milky Way. Come join us on this subequatorial adventure.

What we will do:
Bonaire more than any other island in the world is known for its shallow water reefs that are accessible from shore and only a fins kick below the waters surface making these waters a snorkeling and diving paradise. Here, we use underwater cameras to photograph marine organisms in their natural habitats and collect small creatures that we can image on land under our microscopes. There, we will study the fine detail and intricate structures of life – at a point where art and science merge in a labyrinth of discovery, understanding, and creativity. Through our journey we hope to combine music, art, science, and newfound friendships to create an unparalleled, once in a lifetime expedition – to create lasting memories and stories to be told. Come join us. Live Magnified!

$2,200 (airfare not included)

Joe DeGiorgis (Expedition Leader)
508.292.4605
[email protected]

Darya Warner (Chief of Operations)
646.491.2242
[email protected]

The image is of the expedition team of our last expedition ion ABACO Island in the Bahamas in March of 2016. From bottom left to right – Art Director and Head SCUBA Diver Chris O’Flaherty, Actor, Narrator and Chief Anchor Operator Arnaud Spanos, BioArtist and Head of Operations Darya Warner. Top left to right – Expedition Leader Joe DeGiorgis, Lead Scientist and Underwater Cinematographer Lucas Pozzo-Miller, Artist and Naturalist Regan Rosburg, Environmental Artist/Photographer and Author Chris Jordan, and Snorkeling Aficionado and Head Chef Victor Jordan. Our trusted Captain Jess Berndt is behind the camera. The image is of the expedition team of our last expedition ion ABACO Island in the Bahamas in March of 2016. From bottom left to right – Art Director and Head SCUBA Diver Chris O’Flaherty, Actor, Narrator and Chief Anchor Operator Arnaud Spanos, BioArtist and Head of Operations Darya Warner.

Top left to right – Expedition Leader Joe DeGiorgis, Lead Scientist and Underwater Cinematographer Lucas Pozzo-Miller, Artist and Naturalist Regan Rosburg, Environmental Artist/Photographer and Author Chris Jordan, and Snorkeling Aficionado and Head Chef Victor Jordan. Our trusted Captain Jess Berndt is behind the camera.

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François-Joseph Lapointe

Francois-Joseph Lapointe

François-Joseph Lapointe is a biologist/bioartist from Montreal. As part of his scientific research, he is interested in molecular evolution, metagenomics, and population genetics.
As an artist, he is interested in the application of biological concepts and the use of living media in performative experiments. His most recent project is to sequence his microbiome (and that of his wife) to generate metagenomic self-portraits (or “microbiome selfies”).

http://www.fjlapointe.ca/

Stefani Bardin

Stefani Bardin

Stefani Bardin explores the influences of corporate culture and industrial food production on our food system and the environment. She works with neuroscientists, biologists and gastroenterologists to ground her research in the scientific world. These investigations take the form of single and multi-channel videos, immersive and interactive installations as well as tools for measuring and/or mediating these influences.

Several of her current projects include M2A: The Fantastic Voyage, an ongoing collaboration with a Gastroenterologist at Harvard University using wireless gastroenterology devices to look at the impact of processed foods versus whole and less processed foods on the body; M(y)crobes – a project with a neuroscientist and digital artist that explores human cohabitation with the microbes that live within, on and around us using wearable biosensors to measure the effects of one’s own biotic micro-ecosystem in concert with the macro-ecosystem of the environment; and La Casita Verde, a 2000 square foot lot empty lot in South Williamsburg awarded to her and her collaborator Brooke Singer by the NYC Parks Department to develop an R + D lab for art, science and technology projects that address issues within the Food Soil Web. They are partnered with members of the community to also address issues of urban design, urban agriculture and urban intervention and just received a $25,000 grant from the Greenpoint Community Environmental Fund to develop curriculum in the space.

Her work has been written about in Wired Magazine, Scientific American, Art21, Forbes, New York Magazine, The Huffington Post and The Village Voice. She is currently working on an article about the role of science in her work for The Arts, Science and Technology journal Leonardo.

www.stefanibardin.net

Kirby Gookin

Kirby Gookin

Kirby Gookin is a writer, curator, public artist, and professor of critical studies in the Department of Art and Art Professions at NYU, and the Department of Art History at The School of Visual Arts, where he teaches, among other courses, Avant-Gardening: Art, Food and Agriculture. He has contributed to Artforum (as staff critic), Artscribe, Arts Magazine, Interview, and Parkett; and has written essays for several gallery and museum publications including Creative Time: 33 Years.

Wythe Marschall

Wythe Marschall

James Walsh Artic NYC

James Walsh

James Walsh has been making art in a variety of media since 1986 and has shown throughout the United States, and in Turkey, Italy, England and Sweden. He is the author of two books, Foundations (1997) and Solvitur Ambulando (2003), and numerous unique and limited-edition artist’s books. Awards and residencies include a Fulbright Fellowship to Turkey and residencies at The MacDowell Colony, The Edward Albee Foundation, Art Omi, and Center for Book Arts. His work comes out of a love for natural history, particularly the history of natural history. For the past several years, he has been learning botany by identifying, pressing and mounting plants found in his neighborhood, which has resulted in two ongoing projects: A Flora of the Gowanus and the Index to Arctic Plants of New York City. Walsh studied literature at Hobart College, Geneva, NY, and at Oxford University, England.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg

Heather Dewey-Hagborg

Heather Dewey-Hagborg is a Chicago-based transdisciplinary artist and educator who is interested in art as research and critical practice.

She  has shown work internationally at events and venues including the World Economic Forum, Shenzhen Urbanism and Architecture Bienniale, the New Museum, and PS1 MOMA. Her work has been widely discussed in the media, from the New York Times and the BBC to TED and Wired.

She is an Assistant Professor of Art and Technology Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a 2016 Creative Capital award grantee in the area of Emerging Fields.

http://deweyhagborg.com

Dejan Lukic

Dejan Lukic

Received a PhD in anthropology from Columbia University. Wrote a book on terrorism and aesthetics. Currently writing manuscripts on charisma and images, ideology and the sea, ocularity and power, vitalism and culinary arts. Taught at Columbia University, Rutgers University, The New School, Reed College, and presently the School of Visual Arts where he trains students in the MFA Art Writing program. Co-directs Vitalist Cuisine.

Oron Catts

Oron Catts is the director of SymbioticA, the Centre of Excellence in Biological Arts, within the School of Anatomy and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia.

Oron Catts is an artist, researcher and curator whose pioneering work with the Tissue Culture and Art Project which he established in 1996 is considered a leading biological art project. In 2000 he co-founded SymbioticA, an artistic research centre housed within the School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, The University of Western Australia. Under Catts’ leadership SymbioticA has gone on to win the Prix Ars Electronica Golden Nica in Hybrid Art (2007) the WA Premier Science Award  (2008) and became a Centre for Excellence in 2008. In 2009 Catts was recognised by Thames & Hudson’s “60 Innovators Shaping our Creative Future” book in the category “Beyond Design”, and by Icon Magazine (UK) as one of the top 20 Designers, “making the future and transforming the way we work”.

Catts interest is Life; more specifically the shifting relations and perceptions of life in the light of new knowledge and it applications. Often working in collaboration with other artists (mainly Dr. Ionat Zurr) and scientists, Catts have developed a body of work that speak volumes about the need for new cultural articulation of evolving concepts of life. Catts was a Research Fellow in Harvard Medical School, a visiting Scholar at the Department of Art and Art History, Stanford University, and a Visiting Professor of Design Interaction, Royal College of Arts, London. Catts’ ideas and projects reach beyond the confines of art; his work is often cited as inspiration to diverse areas such as new materials, textiles, design, architecture, ethics, fiction, and food.

Our Biotech Future(s)

2016 exhibition biodesign poster web

Our Biotech Future(s): Student projects from the Biodesign Challenge

Opening Reception
Thursday, June 23, 2016
7-9 PM

SVA Fine Arts Building
School of Visual Arts
335 W 16th St, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10011

Please join us for the gallery opening of Our Biotech Future(s): Student Projects from the Biodesign Challenge at School of Visual Arts (SVA).

Nine art and design teams from universities across the United States showcase their visions of the future of biotechnology. Chosen from dozens of students, the finalists worked throughout the academic year with art and design professors, scientists and subject-matter experts to explore the many possible ways biotechnology could affect our environment and our lives.

Playing on the title of physicist Freeman Dyson’s seminal essay, ”Our Biotech Future,” the show presents a multiplicity of “futures,” some of which align, while others clash. Learn more about the projects at Biodesignchallenge.org.

The gallery show will run from June 23 – July 1, 2016 at SVA Fine Arts Building.

Light snacks and drinks will be provided.

Schools

Stabilimentum, University of Pennsylvania
Mónica Butler, Rebecca Van Sciver, Jiwon Woo

Float Farm, New York University
Ayaka Habu, Carter Bird, Theo Mandin-Lee

MyoTomato, School of Visual Arts

Andrew Cziraki, Victor Taboada, Darya Warner & John Wells

Mutua, Southern California Institute of Architecture
Mun Yi Cheng, Caleb Fisher, Brendan Ho, Ryan Odom, Anthony Stoffella & Xiangtia Sun

Symbiosis, Carnegie Mellon University

Stowe Hammarburg, Daniel Kim, Yooyoung Ko, Zachary Schwemler & Jessica Shen

Liver Clear, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Amanda Harrold, Kathleen McDermott, Jacob Steiner and Perrine Papillaud

Starter Culture, Maryland Institute College of Art
Gage Branda, Sarah Whelton, Jake O’Hagan, Emma Whitlock

Dewpoint, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Bailey Beatt, Maurice Hampton, Jackie Huang, Sam Scheib

Bioesters, Fashion Institute of Technology
Tessa Callaghanbe, Gian Cui, Aleksandra Gosiewski, Theanne Schiros, Asta Skocir

 

 

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2016 Anna Dumitriu and Alex May

Lecture: Anna Dumitriu and Alex May

April 4, 2016
7:00 pm

Room 302, 3rd Floor

Anna Dumitriu will discuss her experiences of creating art embedded in bioscience settings and will describe some personal projects, for example working with the Modernising Medical Microbiology group at The University of Oxford, and exploring the field of synthetic biology at the University of California Irvine.
Alex May will share his work exploring a wide range of digital technologies, most notably the technique known as video mapping or projection mapping, which he practices using software he authored. He also designs interactive installations, generative works and full-size humanoid robots, sometimes in collaboration with Anna Dumitriu. He will discuss their collaborative projects “Sequence”, “Super-organism” and “My Robot Companion”.


Anna Dumitriu (1969) is a bioartist based in the UK. Her work investigates the microbiological world and the latest technologies we use to study it. She works with textile craft techniques, sculpture, video installation, and live bacteria, actually using the tools and techniques of microbiology as artistic media.
http://www.normalflora.co.uk

Alex May (1972) is a British artist exploring a wide range of digital technologies, including video mapping, interactive installations, generative works, full-size humanoid robots, performance and video art. He is a visiting research fellow: artist in residence in the Department of Computer Science at The University of Hertfordshire.
http://www.alexmayarts.co.uk

Free and Open to the public.

Please note, lecture will take place in Room 302, 3rd Floor.

SVA Fine Arts Building
335 W 16th St.

New York, NY 10011 United States

+ Google Map
Website:
http://bfafinearts.sva.edu

Soiled: iGEM International Competition

soiled-flyer-SVA-Gallery-2016

Exhibition
Soiled: iGEM International Competition

Curator: Suzanne Anker

SVA Chelsea Gallery
601 West 26 Street, 15th fl oor
February 27 to March 12, 2016
Reception: Thursday, March 3, 6-8 PM

Soiled i​s the School of Visual Arts’ winning project in the Art and Design track of the 2015 iGEM competition. The project consists of a speculative mobile device and a multimedia installation denoting the respective results of soil samples collected throughout the New York metropolitan area.

The 2016 Soiled exhibition will be held at the School of Visual Arts Gallery in Chelsea (NYC) to highlight the aesthetic and conceptual aspects of the project. Various parts of the jamboree installation along with reagents, consumables, prototypes, and graphics will be displayed with descriptions about the piece and statements from the student artists who took part in the competition.

Please join us for the opening reception on Thursday, March 3, 2016, from 6 to 8 PM

 

WSJ-Plant-Hackers

WSJ – Move Over Silicon Valley, Plant Hackers Start a Tech Bloom

The SVA Bio Art Lab, featured on the front page of the Wall Street Journal

Instead of Computer Code, ‘Plant Hackers’ Tinker With Genetics

Do-it-yourself bioengineers tinker with genetic code; blue roses

By Bradley Hope
Jan. 19, 2016

http://www.wsj.com/articles/instead-of-computer-code-plant-hackers-tinker-with-genetics-1453254509

After his parents go to bed, Sebastian Cocioba usually retires to the third bedroom of the family apartment, where he has built a laboratory.

Suntory ‘Applause’

There, amid the whir of climate-controlling fans and equipment harvested from eBay, he is working on what he hopes will one day become a lucrative career. Mr. Cocioba, 25 years old, is a plant hacker.

“I want to make flowers no one has ever seen,” he says, wearing shorts and a T-shirt on a recent day at his home in Queens, N.Y. “What would happen if you combined features of a pine tree with an eggplant?” He also wants to turn a rose blue.

Born into an earlier generation, Mr. Cocioba might have spent hours writing computer programs. Instead he is at the vanguard of a millennial niche: do-it-yourself bioengineering. In place of a keyboard, he has a homemade “gene gun” that fires genetic material into plants on a blast of tiny tungsten particles.

A growing coterie of plant hackers and synthetic biology startups have their sights set on creating some bizarre and wondrous creations: glowing plants, fragrant moss and flowers that change colors when you pour beer into the soil.

Such plants have long been possible, but the research and experimentation was time-consuming and expensive. The first glowing plants were invented by scientists trying to better understand genetics.

Antony Evans, 35, chief executive of Taxa, a Silicon Valley company launched last year as a platform for would-be plant designers, says such creations are part of a broader movement.

ENLARGE Close-ups of tomato plants grown from cuttings at the School of Visual Arts’ Bio Art Lab. Mr. Cocioba uses common plants like tomatoes and tobacco to explore gene modification. Photo: Bradley Hope/The Wall Street Journal

“I can see a future where genetic engineering becomes acceptable and commonplace, where some teenagers have ideas for plants and make them the same way kids make mobile apps today,” he said.

For plant hackers, no prize is bigger or more sought-after than the “true” blue rose.

“It’s a bit of a unicorn,” said Keira Havens, co-founder of Revolution Bioengineering in Fort Collins, Colo., a startup working with scientists on plant bioengineering projects. “It is elusive.”

Blue roses are available from some florists, but they aren’t “true” in the eyes of biologists because they are simply dyed. The mythical flower, which doesn’t exist in nature, has been pursued for centuries, with dubious claims as far back as the 12th century.

It is referred to in Chinese and Middle Eastern folk tales, as well as a Rudyard Kipling poem (“Half the world I wandered through/Seeking where such flowers grew/Half the world unto my quest/Answered me with laugh and jest.”)

In 1840, the horticulture societies of the U.K. and Belgium offered a 500,000 franc reward for a true blue rose, but no prize was awarded.

It is also thought to be the Holy Grail in the annual $10 billion cut-flower industry, where new and novel plants can earn big profits.

The closest anyone has come to creating a true blue rose is a Japanese whisky consortium, Suntory Holdings Ltd.

Suntory teamed up with Florigene, an Australian genetic engineering firm focusing on plants. The company, now known as Suntory Flowers Ltd., created the first purple carnations, sold across the world under names such as Moonshade and Moonvista.

In 2004, the firm announced it had finally cracked the code of the blue rose. But it turned out to only include blue pigments—a significant scientific achievement. To the human eye, it is lavender in color. The rose, called “Applause,” is only available in Japan, for $25 each. The company is continuing to try to make a bluer rose.

One of the biggest challenges is lowering the acidity of the plant so that the blue color can become more visible.

Mr. Cocioba is researching blue plants along with Suzanne Anker, an artist who uses biological material in her work and is the director of the Bio Art Lab at the School of Visual Arts in Manhattan.

By day, Mr. Cocioba is a scientific consultant in the lab. In between student sessions, he has been experimenting with turning tobacco plants blue, using the DNA from a type of blue coral.

He is almost entirely self-taught. He studied biology at Stony Brook University, but dropped out. For several years, he cloned orchids—a process of growing new plants from pieces of other plants—to sell to local florists. Slowly he built up his lab and began to better understand the delicate process of altering plant DNA, mostly through reading online and discussing projects with other would-be plant hackers.

“It’s about democratizing science,” he says.

Another major target for biohackers are plants that glow using DNA from bioluminescent jellyfish or fireflies. The first such plants available to consumers produce only a very modest glow.

The “Starlight Avatar,” available for about $35 from Bioglow Inc., is a ghostly plant sent to buyers in a closed plastic container. Its glow can only be detected if taken into a pitch dark room for enough time for retinas to adjust to its faint emissions. It can’t be exposed to the air or sunlight without the risk of dying.

Alexander Krichevsky, 40, the research director of the company in St. Louis, said he is working on brighter, more-resilient plants. He says his main clients now are “people between 20 and 30 years old, usually with computer professions,” or major fans of the science-fiction film “Avatar,” which featured glowing plants in its fictional world of Pandora.

Mr. Evans, of Taxa, is also the founder of a company that raised $484,000 on the crowdfunding website Kickstarter for its glowing plant in 2013, but hasn’t delivered yet. He said delivery of glowing plant seeds to backers will start this year.

Next in production is a new kind of moss that smells like patchouli that could be a replacement for air fresheners one day.

After that, he too will make a go at the blue rose, he says.

 

Read article and watch video on WSJ.com

iGEM 2015 SVA

iGEM 2015

iGEM 2015 SVA
iGEM 2015 Winner:
Best Art & Design Project

Our project, Soiled, won a gold medal for the Best Art & Design Project during the iGEM 2015 Giant Jamboree.

Our project was also nominated for:
– Best Integrated Human Practices
– Best Education and Public Engagement
– Best Presentation

300 iGEM teams competed for these honorable mentions.

http://2015.igem.org/Team:SVA-NYC


iGEM

The iGEM Foundation is dedicated to education and competition, advancement of synthetic biology, and the development of open community and collaboration.

The main program at the iGEM Foundation is the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Competition. The iGEM Competition is the premiere student competition in Synthetic Biology. Since 2004, participants of the competition have experienced education, teamwork, sharing, and more in a unique competition setting.

Giant Jamboree

September 24-28 – Hynes Convention Center – Boston
More than 2700 attendees participated in the largest synthetic biology event to date. The Giant Jamboree celebrates the hard work and dedication shown by the 280 multidisciplinary iGEM teams from all over the world. See details of the event at 2015.igem.org/Giant_Jamboree.

Soiled

Soiled i​s the project name for the the School of Visual Arts’ participation in the Art and Design track of the 2015 iGEM competition. By creating a speculative mobile device, a non­toxic methodology is implemented to test nutrient values in soil for the urban gardener.

Consisting of a multi­media installation composed of computer generated cut­outs in the shapes of the five boroughs of New York City, the works are fabricated from compressed board, lucite sheets and LED lights. Denoting the respective results of soil samples collected throughout the New York metropolitan area, as a visual representation the installation is consistent with the scientific processes of creating chemical color reactions. A spectrophotometer was employed to indicate the precise levels of nutrients in the aforementioned samples. By investigating alternative methods of analysis our microfluidic device holds promise for deciphering soil nutrients in a more ecological manner.

The installation functions as both a data representation of our sampling sites and additionally relies on aesthetic principles of investigation. Color which crosses the boundaries between art and science as a perceptual marker is of extreme importance in both practices, pointing at once to the ways knowledge is produced.

Visit Soiled Wiki: http://2015.igem.org/Team:SVA-NYC

logos-igem-sva

2015 Summer Residency
Open Studios

Bio Art Summer Residency
Open Studios

Thursday, June 18, 2015
6-8pm

SVA Fine Arts Building
335 West 16th Street
New York, NY 10011

Free and open to the public

Members of the SVA Summer Residency Program at the Fine Arts Bio Art Lab present work that focuses on the intersection of art and science. Participating artists include JoAnn Block, Andrew Cziraki, Maria Gracia Donoso, Tal Eshed, Mara Haseltine, Mille Kalsmose-Hjelmborg, Steph Mantis, Judith Mont, Liana Nigri Moszkowicz, Martha Paola Ramos, Virginia Sperry, Grace Stokes, Ayse Suter, Victor Taboada Urtuzuastegui and Lola Young.

CUNY TV
Science & U!: Science and The Arts

Science & U! this month explores the artistic side of science:
Donna Hanover goes to the School of Visual Arts where students are using the techniques of biology labs in creating artistic works.

Original tape date: June 2, 2015.
First aired: June 2, 2015.

Watch CUNY TV visit to SVA Bio Art Lab on Youtube

Science & U! explores the world of science, taking the headlines and information you need and showing its importance in our everyday life. From technology, research and health to kids, humor and the arts each program explores these topics in clear, concise and engaging presentations designed for audiences of all backgrounds and ages!

Regular air times

1st Tuesday of each month
8am, 2pm, 8pm

Molecular Cuisine: The politics of taste

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On Friday February 13th, 2015, Suzanne Anker and Victoria Vesna hosted “Molecular Cuisine: The Politics of Taste” in conjunction with Leonardo’s Education and Arts Forum (LEAF) for the College Art Association, CAA. This event was a sit down dinner investigating the various ways cultures approach the concept of food.  From molecular cuisine to sushi to miracle berries, we explored the intricacies between taste and value, employing food as a filter and as an art material.

 

BIO ART & DESIGN AWARD Open Call

http://www.badaward.nl/open-call-2015/

Artists and designers interested in the life sciences are invited to propose new projects for funding. The BIO ART & DESIGN AWARD (previously called the DA4GA) grants three awards, each of them is €25.000, to fully realize a new work of art or design that pushes the boundaries of research application and creative expression. Winning proposals are developed in collaboration with a Dutch research institution over several months then exhibited to the public in MU Art Space in Eindhoven at the end of the year.

To be eligible for the award you must have graduated no longer than five years ago from a design or art program at either the Masters or Bachelors level. Applicants are encouraged to relate their proposals to recent advances in the life sciences, including (but not limited to) those within specialties such as biomedicine, synthetic biology and ecology. Please be sure to read all information about the call, deadlines, regulations and requirements before submitting an application on the website.The BIO ART & DESIGN AWARD highlights and explores exciting new intersections among design, artistic practice and the life sciences. The award is a product of collaboration between ZonMW, NWO, TU/e, the Waag Society, BioArt Laboratories and MU. The call procedure will be carried out by ZonMW.

The deadline for applications is 2 February 2015.

Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature

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International Conference, SVA NYC. November 14-16, 2014

http://naturallyhypernatural.sva.edu

Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature is an interdisciplinary conference investigating the fluctuating “essences” of “nature” and the “natural” in the 21st century. Each of these terms carries with it an enormity of philosophical questions ranging from the alteration of life itself to dialogues concerning the notion of the Anthropocene, a term used to describe man’s intervention into the natural world. The talks presented here will focus on contemporary issues in the visual arts as they intersect with the biological and geological sciences, confirming that nature remains an intrinsically mysterious, ever more mutable entity.  At the present time, cellular parts are being remixed in laboratories to create synthetic organisms while geological transformations are forecasting wild swings in weather conditions. Human reproduction regularly occurs in Petri dishes while cucumbers are grown in space. The artificial and the natural now combine to form novel entities, never before seen on earth, while animal species dwindle down to extinction every day.  Animals and plants are exhibited as contemporary art, while the real is conflated with the imaginary. Technological advances and their theoretical undertones have migrated into art practice producing New Media installations, Bio Art exhibitions and a global community of art practitioners adapting novel productions to cultural resources.   In addition, visual art has become a social practice platform with projects that intersect with urban farming, DIY biology and extremes in performance art.  Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature brings together artists, historians, curators, philosophers and scientists to examine and comment on these ideas.

Naturally Hypernatural:
Visions of Nature

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International Conference, SVA NYC
14-16 November, 2014
naturallyhypernatural.sva.edu

Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature is an interdisciplinary conference investigating the fluctuating “essences” of “nature” and the “natural” in the 21st century. Each of these terms carries with it an enormity of philosophical questions ranging from the alteration of life itself to dialogues concerning the notion of the Anthropocene, a term used to describe man’s intervention into the natural world. The talks presented here will focus on contemporary issues in the visual arts as they intersect with the biological and geological sciences, confirming that nature remains an intrinsically mysterious, ever more mutable entity.  At the present time, cellular parts are being remixed in laboratories to create synthetic organisms while geological transformations are forecasting wild swings in weather conditions. Human reproduction regularly occurs in Petri dishes while cucumbers are grown in space. The artificial and the natural now combine to form novel entities, never before seen on earth, while animal species dwindle down to extinction every day.  Animals and plants are exhibited as contemporary art, while the real is conflated with the imaginary. Technological advances and their theoretical undertones have migrated into art practice producing New Media installations, Bio Art exhibitions and a global community of art practitioners adapting novel productions to cultural resources.   In addition, visual art has become a social practice platform with projects that intersect with urban farming, DIY biology and extremes in performance art.  Naturally Hypernatural: Visions of Nature brings together artists, historians, curators, philosophers and scientists to examine and comment on these ideas.

In addition, there will be an exhibition of work by students, alumni and faculty, generated through SVA’s Bio Art Laboratory, the first of its kind in the U.S.A.

For more information, complete program and speakers, please visit http://naturallyhypernatural.sva.edu/

School of Visual Arts
Fine Arts Department
335 W 16th St
New York, NY 10011

logos

Rainbow Loom

Rainbow Loom / 彩虹幻象

Rainbow Loom
 / 彩虹幻象
SUZANNE ANKER / 
苏珊 安克个展
10/11-11/25, 2014
V Art center / 视界艺术中心
No.50 moganshan Rd./ 莫干山路50号
building 6,floor 1 / 六号楼一层
Shanghai, China / 中国上海

10/9-10/25, 2014
SNAP
33 middle sichuan Rd./ 四川中路33号
room 901/ 901室
Shanghai, China / 中国上海

Curated by: Hu Renyi / 策展人: 胡任乂
Organized by: Chao Jiaxing / 統筹人: 巢佳幸
Translation and Design: Zeng Weixi / 翻译和设计: 曾维希

Rainbow Loom, two solo exhibitions by American artist Suzanne Anker, addresses the intersections between nature’s products to those manufactured by science and industry. At V Art Center, specimens from nature are accompanied by those of synthetic origin. The installation, in accord with the color wheel and its variations of chroma, points to the wonder of life’s diversity. Tomatoes, spices, herbs, eggs and insects and other specimens are juxtaposed with steel wool, beads, and paper among various industrial products to produce small still life configurations.  Each arrangement is displayed in a petri dish, a glass apparatus commonly employed in scientific laboratory experiments. The installation is an array of 400 elements exposing the rich and luminous colors inherent in the contemporary world. The exhibition opens on October 11 and runs through November 25, 2014.

The exhibition begins at SNAP, where projected video and photographs on silk document a coral research laboratory in Florida in the USA.  Mote laboratory is a research institute experimenting on restoring coral and developing a genetic seed bank to classify these animals. Coral reefs, which create habitats for numerous plants and animals, are under siege throughout the world. These images present indoor tanks, as healing factories, for these beautiful creatures, which at a later time will be released into the wild. This exhibition opens on October 9 and runs through October 25, 2014.

LECTURES
Cut, Paste, Print: Transforming Reproductive Limits
October 10, 7-9pm
Minsheng Art Museum
Minsheng Video Room, Floor 2, Bldg.F No.570 West Huaihai Road
Speaker: Suzanne Anker; Guest: Hu Renyi

Where is the Art in Bio Art?

October 15, 7-9pm
Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai
Gate 7, People’s Park, 231 Nanjing West Road, Shanghai
Speaker: Suzanne Anker; Guest: Hu Renyi

From the Laboratory to the Studio: Intersections of Art, Design and Technology

October 13, 10:30-11:30am (lecture); 1:30-3:30pm (workshop)
Shanghai Institute of Visual Art
2200 Wenxiang Road, Songjiang Shanghai,
Shanghai Institute of Visual Art, Building 4( Yifei Building )
Speaker: Suzanne Anker; Guest: Hu Renyi

 

“Where is the Art in Bio Art?” in the New York Times

The New York Times
Science | The Scan

Science Events: Dancing Particle Physics and Science-Inspired Fashion

By JASCHA HOFFMAN. SEPT. 29, 2014

Where Is the Art in Bio Art?
School of Visual Arts, Flatiron Gallery, 133/141 West 21st Street, Manhattan. Through Oct. 18; reception at6 p.m. Oct. 1. Free.

When Shane Boddington was growing up in rural Zimbabwe, he remembers craving an orange to quench his thirst. Now he is trying to splice a citrus gene into a tobacco plant to create a transgenic hybrid that smells like an orange. Mr. Boddington is not a biologist, however: He is an art student at the School of Visual Arts, whose Bio Art Lab was founded in 2011 to help young artists to put down their brushes and work with plants, animals and microbes using techniques like tissue engineering and cloning. At this show, one student will project colorized videos of wiggling ants to show the complexity of the gestural language they use to communicate. Another student has built a machine that makes entrancing mounds of glowing bubbles using a compound found in bioluminescent algae. There are also works from faculty members: Brandon Ballengée will show a skate fish preserved with a 19th-century technique that reveals its inner structure, and the lab’s director, Suzanne Anker, will contribute a 3-D replica of an egg in a petri dish with a dead insect. The purpose of bio art is to “demystify science and turn it into raw material for the practice of art,” Ms. Anker said — art that questions “what it means to be human at a time when technologies are changing how we reproduce, grow food and make drugs.”


Opening Reception: Wednesday October 1st, 6-8pm
View photographs of the exhibition
Read The beginnings and the ends of Bio Art by Suzanne Anker at Artlink.com

Where is the Art in Bio Art? Installation view

Where is the Art in Bio Art?

September 27 – October 18, 2014
Reception: Wednesday, October 1, 20146-8pm

SVA Flatiron Gallery 
133/141 West 21st Street
Tel: 212.592.2145
[email protected]

Free and open to the public
Monday through Friday 9:00am – 7:00pm,
Saturday 10:00am – 6:00pm
Closed Sunday and federal holidays.

Installation views

Details

School of Visual Arts presents Where is the Art in Bio Art?—an exhibition of biologically-infused art that makes use of a variety of materials and media including sculpture that grows mushrooms, fluorescent bacteria paintings, and a bio-luminescent bubble machine. Also video, sculpture and other media artworks are presented. The exhibition will be on view September 27 through October 18 at the SVA Flatiron Gallery, 133/141 West 21st Street, New York City. The Opening Reception will be held on October 1st, from 6 to 8pm.

Created by BFA Fine Arts students, alumni and faculty, these works were generated in the state-of-the-art SVA Bio Art Lab, the first facility of its kind in the United States. The exhibition is curated by Suzanne Anker, chair of BFA Fine Arts and an internationally recognized Bio Art pioneer.

“Bio Art summons awareness of the political, economic and social consequences of altering life,” explains Anker. “It is supported in myriad formats, from painting and sculpture to performance art and new media installations. Artists employ biological processes such as cloning, tissue engineering and plant breeding, and incorporate plants, animals, microorganisms, sensors and soil, among other materials, into their work.”
Read full article by Suzanne Anker: The beginnings and the ends of Bio Art at Artlink

The Bio Art Lab was founded in 2011 as part of the BFA Fine Arts Department at SVA as a place where scientific tools and techniques become tools and techniques in art practice. Housing skeleton collections, specimen collections, slide collections, microscopes for photo and video, an herbarium, an aquarium and a library, the Lab is located in the heart of New York City’s Chelsea gallery district at 335 West 16th Street.

Giovanni Frazzetto

Giovanni Frazzetto was born and grew up on the east coast of Sicily.
In 1995, after high school, he moved to the UK to study science at University College London and in 2002 he received a PhD from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg. Since he was a student he has worked and written on the relationship between science, society and culture, publishing in journals such as EMBOreports and Nature.
He was one of the founders of the European Neuroscience & Society Network and the creator of the transdisciplinary Neuroschools. Giovanni has also written short stories and plays and curated science-inspired art exhibitions. For his transdisciplinary efforts he was awarded the 2008 John Kendrew Young Scientist Award. His book How We Feel, on the neuroscience of emotions, was listed among The Guardian 2013 Best Books of Psychology.  He now lives between London and Berlin where he works at the Institute for Advanced Study.

Molecular Cuisine: The Politics of Taste International Conference

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Molecular_Cuisine

October 19-21, 2012
New York
http://molecularcuisine.sva.edu

Molecular Cuisine: The Politics of Taste is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on desire’s palette. Investigating the importance of taste from the perspectives of the culinary arts, sociology, art history and theory, anthropology, as well as the cognitive, material and biological sciences, the symposium targets intersections between taste and value. While taste is the key concept in new cooking technologies, it also connects to our passions, predilections and taboos. Researchers from the scientific and cultural spheres ask the questions, why we enjoy certain foods and not others, why we prefer certain styles and not others. Involving multiple discourses which emphasize the senses, emotions and sensory assets, the concept of taste, which is traditionally one pertaining to the fine arts or humanities, develops a renewed relevance in current cultural debates.

Embodied Fantasies International Conference

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embodied_fantasies

28-30 October, 2011
New York
http://embodiedfantasies.sva.edu

Conference
Embodied Fantasies, a concept central to art history, theory and practice is concurrently a topic debated in the fields of the neuro- and cognitive sciences, philosophy and phenomenology. This theme will be addressed in a transdisciplinary conference hosting scholars and artists from the fields of architecture, art history, visual art, history of science and psychology among others. Discussions will focus on concepts of embodiment as they relate to sexuality, aesthetics, epistemology, perception and fantasy itself. Approaches to the role of fantasies will be viewed beyond traditional conceptions to include complex thinking processes, subjectivity, and the inter-subjective. Prominent attention will be paid to fantasies and images as a form of knowledge production.

Speakers include: Gabriele Brandstetter (Freie Universität, Berlin), Mark Dery (Cultural Critic), Frank Gillette (SVA), Dan Hutto (University of Hertfordshire, UK), Mitchell Joachim (TerreformONE), Arthur I. Miller (University of London, UK), Alva Noë (University of California and CUNY), Shelley Rice (NYU), McKenzie Wark (The New School), among others.

Grahame Weinbren

Grahame Weinbren, recognized as a pioneer of interactive cinema, has made films and installations for over 30 years. His high definition short films “Letters” were exhibited in the 2008 Berlin Film Festival and the 2010 Zero1 San Jose Biennial. Weinbren has published and lectured for three decades on cinema, interactivity, and new media. He is the senior editor of the Millennium Film Journal and teaches in the graduate faculty of the School of Visual Arts in New York.

http://grahameweinbren.net/

Mitchell Joachim

Mitchell Joachim is acknowledged as an innovator in ecological design, architecture, and urban design. He is an Associate Professor in Practice at NYU and EGS in Switzerland. Mitchell Joachim’s specific professional interest has been adapting principles of physical and social ecology to architecture, city design, transport, and environmental planning. He earned a Ph.D. at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MAUD Harvard University, M.Arch. Columbia University.

http://www.archinode.com/

Liora Yuklea

A third of the food produced in the world today goes to waste. There are several causes, one of which is the culling of perfectly edible and nutritious food in order to meet high industry and consumer standards of size, color, weight and blemish level. According to a recent report, up to 40% of fruit and vegetable crops in Britain don’t make it to store shelves because they are deemed too ‘ugly’. Our obsession with appearance is manifesting in our eating habits – and like fashion and cosmetics, industrial production is engineering our food to be artificially ‘perfect’ and bland, rather than naturally rich in look and taste.

A Fine Line is a dining set – half of it has been mass produced, finely cut and given a sleek finish. The other half grew organically from a mix of mushroom mycelium and wood waste, the texture and colour of the resulting structure being nature’s design. The line between industry and nature crosses between them – and on our plates.

http://fineline-my.co/

 

NYC DNA Barcoding Project

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Workshop with Ellen D. Jorgensen, Ph. D
Free and open to all SVA students, faculty and staff.
*limited availability

Artists raise questions that scientists often fail to think about. What are the consequences of the ease with which we now can read and write the very code of life? Should we encourage open-access biotechnology?

We will explore different aspects of the interface of art and DNA-based science, including working with DNA, genomic information and genetically-engineered organisms as materials, experiencing the processes used for reading the code of life and tinkering with it to literally grow your own creations. Individual and team projects that alter and incorporate living organisms and their data will be developed and showcased at the end of the semester. Students will venture out into the city to collect samples and bring them back to the lab to process and analyze. The workshops will be an exploration in the materials and processes of Do-It-Yourself biotechnology.

Bio-materials: A Sampler

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Bio Art workshop with Oliver Medvedik, Ph.D.
Free and open to all SVA students, faculty and staff.
*Limited availability

This very hands-on and team-based workshop will introduce the student to novel biological materials isolated from organisms that will be used in the design and building of bioluminescent and fluorescent displays and the fabrication of grown structures. We will be working with both genetically engineered and naturally occurring organisms. We will learn the basic techniques of genetic engineering and will modify bacteria to induce fluorescent and bioluminescent protein and pigment production. Participants will also learn proper sterile techniques in growing bacterial and fungal cultures. The products of our living cultures will be used as part of a class project to design and build bio-fluorescent displays along with rigid scaffolding produced by fungal mycelia and flexible surfaces produced by cellulose secreting bacteria.

FOOD: Projects in Bio-Art

FID-3644-A
Thursday 3:00-8:50
Fall semester: 3 studio credits
Instructor: Suzanne Anker

You are what you eat or are you? Do you know what is in your food? From farm to fork what happens in between? This course focuses on how food production, industrial farming, and GMO’s have become part of our daily life. Projects will consists of growing plants hydroponically, DNA analysis of local food, and microscopic imaging of foodstuffs. In addition we will explore the cultural differences, taboos and evolution of eating practices. We will look at the culinary styles around the world, their social, economic and political ramifications. We will introduce projects in urban farming and molecular cuisine as well as field trips to diverse restaurants. Part forensics, part horticulture we will gather plants to extract pigments for watercolor, and design food sculptures. We will explore the effect microorganisms have on food, from cheese to e-coli, to yogurt. Performance, painting, sculpture, public art, photography, illustration and cartooning, as well as community-based projects are welcome.

Urban Botanicals

FDD-2216-A
Fall semester: 3 credits
Friday: 12:00-2:50
Instructor: Gary Sherman

This class will visit local sites in search of urban botanicals from which to draw creative inspiration. We’ll explore micro and macro environments, the fractal realm of self-similarity and symmetry. We’ll see how the nature/nurture dialectic has been exploited by artists, and look to the less obvious lichens, molds and mosses as alternatives to the more ornamental botanicals. To meet the countless challenges that botanicals present, students will explore various mediums to create drawings/collages that range from the simple to the complex.

Anatomy I

Fall semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

This course offers a “bones up” approach to learning anatomy. By starting with the skeleton, the student will learn about and internalize the structure, form and movement of the body in an effort towards making more informed and intelligent drawings of the live model. A portion of the class will be focused on the comparative anatomy of animals. Materials for the majority of the class will consist of pencil or charcoal and paper.

Course #                 Day         Time

FDD-2020-A         M              9:00-11:50
FDD-2020-B         M              12:00-2:50
FDD-2020-C         Tu             9:00-11:50

Anatomy II

Spring semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

This course offers a “bones up” approach to learning anatomy. By starting with the skeleton, the student will learn about and internalize the structure, form and movement of the body in an effort towards making more informed and intelligent drawings of the live model. A portion of the class will be focused on the comparative anatomy of animals. Materials for the majority of the class will consist of pencil or charcoal and paper.

Course #                 Day         Time

FDD-2025-A         M              9:00-11:50
FDD-2025-B         M              12:00-2:50
FDD-2025-C        Tu             12:00-2:50

Suanne Anker

Suzanne Anker

Suzanne Anker is a visual artist and theorist working at the intersection of art and the biological sciences. She works in a variety of mediums ranging from digital sculpture and installation to large-scale photography to plants grown by LED lights.

Her work has been shown both nationally and internationally in museums and galleries including the Walker Art Center, the Smithsonian Institute, the Phillips Collection, P.S.1 Museum, the JP Getty Museum, the Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charite in Berlin, the Center for Cultural Inquiry in Berlin, the Pera Museum in Istanbul and the Museum of Modern Art in Japan.

Her books include The Molecular Gaze: Art in the Genetic Age, co-authored with the late sociologist Dorothy Nelkin, published in 2004 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Visual Culture and Bioscience, co-published by University of Maryland and the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. Her writings have appeared in Art and America, Seed Magazine, Nature Reviews Genetics, Art Journal, Tema Celeste and M/E/A/N/I/N/G. Her work has been the subject of reviews and articles in the New York Times, Artforum, Art in America, Flash Art, Nature and has been cited by Barbara Maria Stafford, Donna Haraway and Martin Kemp in their texts. Most recently she has collaborated with anthropologist Sarah Franklin, on an article and interview for Social Text journal.

She has hosted twenty episodes of the Bio Blurb show, an Internet radio program originally on WPS1 Art Radio, in collaboration with MoMA in NYC, now archived on Alana Heiss’ Art On Air. She has been a speaker at Harvard University, the Royal Society in London, Cambridge University, Yale University, the London School of Economics, the Max-Planck Institute, Universitiy of Leiden, the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum in Berlin, the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, Banff Art Center any many others.

Chairing SVA’s Fine Arts Department in NYC since 2005, Ms. Anker continues to interweave traditional and experimental media in her department’s new digital initiative and the Nature and Technology BioArt Lab.

http://www.suzanneanker.com

Gary Sherman

Gary Sherman earned his BFA and MFA at the School of Visual Arts. His one-person exhibitions include The Phatory LLC, and group exhibitions include Fractured Atlas; Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT; Arcadia University Art Gallery, Glenside, PA; Library of Congress, Washington, DC and Exit Art. His work is in the collection of the Library of Congress, Washington, DC. He has published in The Shark and La Vigie-Art Contemporain.

George Boorujy

Education: BFA, University of Miami; MFA, School of Visual Arts

One-person exhibitions include: P.P.O.W. Gallery; Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, Snug Harbor Cultural Center; AG Gallery

Group exhibitions include: Socrates Sculpture Park; Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Scotland; Art Chicago: Jack the Pelican Presents; International Fair of Contemporary and Modern Art; Galerie Goff + Rosenthal, Berlin; Diesel Gallery, San Francisco; Smack Mellon; Judson Memorial Church; CRG Gallery; Ricco/Maresca Gallery; Stonefox Artspace; Rotunda Gallery

Publications include: George Boorujy: The Nature of Civilization (exhibition catalog); Time Out New York; NY Arts; Whitehot Magazine; The New Yorker; Brooklyn Rail; Harper’s; The New York Times; Bat City Review; Dirt Press; Anthem

Awards and honors include: New York Foundation for the Arts; artist residency, Smack Mellon

Joe DeGiorgis

Joseph DeGiorgis

Joe graduated with a bachelors’ degree in Oceanography and Marine Ecology from the Florida Institute of Technology and worked as a SCUBA diver for the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He spent time at the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute and at Harvard Medical School before obtaining a PhD in Neuroscience from Brown University. He was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Institutes of Health and is now a Professor of Biology at Providence College and Adjunct Faculty in the MBL Cellular Dynamics Program. Throughout his academic career Joe has been interested in imaging using a wide variety of techniques from underwater photography to light and electron microscopy. Joe has taken his camera and dive gear around the world and has photographed the shipwrecks of Truk Lagoon, the sharks of Palau, the coral walls of Cozumel, and the coral reefs of Thailand, among others. His research focuses on the function of Alzheimer’s proteins and uses the squid giant axon as a model system. His work as been published in magazine articles and on the covers of scientific journals including; Molecular Biology of the Cell and Traffic. Currently, Joe is preparing for a year at sea capturing images of the organisms along Darwin’s Voyage through microscopes, telescopes, and the macro lens.

http://www.mbl.edu/cdp/laboratory-of-joseph-degiorgis

Fur, Feathers, and Scales: Comparative Animal Anatomy

FDD-2041
Tuesday 12:00-2:50
Fall semester: 3 credits
Instructor: George Boorujy

Tracing the animal kingdom from jellyfish to insects to humans, students will gain a working knowledge of comparative animal anatomy. The focus will be on vertebrates (reptiles, birds, and mammals) and the morphological differences which constitute groups, families, and individual species. There will be discussions on ecology, evolution, and the depiction of animals throughout art history. Students will work from specimens from the SVA Nature and Technology Lab, on location drawings, and photos.

Joana Ricou

I am interested in the fact that we are made of many things, many parts and many types of parts.  These parts live side-by-side, working together, sometimes competing, sometimes ignoring each other.  At the SVA residency, I focused on the non-human part of ourselves: the human microbiome.  My background is painting, and in this project, I focused on using the microbiome itself as paint as way of creating different self-portraits.

For more information and images, please visit:
http://jiricou.wix.com/girlsandcells#!microbiomeprocess/c1w99

Erin Davis: Stasis 1-8

Erin Davis

This series explores the implications of navigating new environments while in a state of travel on varying organizational levels.  The jarring disorientation of spaces alien to previous experience, especially space constructed from fragments of said experiences, often leads to endless repetition, erratic attempts to avoid the unknown, or paralysis while internal functions attempt to continue progression.  Through the placement of microscopic organisms found in water samples on the floors of the NYC subway within new environments constructed on a minute scale, these works shed light on the analogous patterns that exist between the interactions microorganisms have with new environments and the unconscious state of becoming humans exist in while traveling from place to place.

www.erindavis.net

Ivan Henriques

Microscopic Chamber #1, 2013
Variable dimensions, mixed media (laser, water, mirror, aquarium, pipettes, bee wax, etc.

Millions of other living entities  surround us all the time and are vital to our well being and also for life in the natural environment. However they exist in such a mode of being that not only many of their behaviour escape human perception, but their presence all together.

Using optics techniques, a droplet of water becomes a lens magnifying this amazing biodiversity of microorganisms presented inside this water droplet when beamed by a laser pointer, creating a microscope-live-cinema installation for the audience.

This work is a step further in a research about the huge biodiversity of microorganisms which lives in water as phytoplankton,  copepods, diatoms, algae, etc, which will be used to develop the next work titled Symbiotic Machine.

www.ivanhenriques.com

Sarah Craske

An artist working at the intersection of arts and science, I intend to create Art and Science collaborations that bring New Forms of Life from ‘the Real’ through physical representation. This is usually resulting in a methodology that generates unrepeatable transformation. With society’s imperative need to move from an object base, commercial and material use culture to a sustainable, ecologically concerned, object-less culture, I reflect on the death of the object in art history, museology and quite literally the actual process of object decay. I question how we move from this practice of collection and taxonomy to another system of knowledge and understanding, that can possibly be stored virtually or in ways we cannot conceive at present.

http://meltdowns.co.uk/the-studios/sarah-craske

Paula Hayes

Paula Hayes is an American visual artist and designer who works with sculpture, drawing, installation art, botany, and landscape design. Hayes has lived and worked in New York City for over two decades and is known for her terrariums and other living artworks, as well as her large-scale public and private landscapes. A major theme in Hayes’ work is the connection of people to the natural environment, and much of her work is concerned with the care that is required to grow and maintain large- and small-scale ecosystems.

http://www.paulahayes.com

Kathy High

Kathy High is an interdisciplinary artist from New York currently working with living systems, animals, and biology and art. She produces videos, sculptures and installations around issues of gender and technology, pursues queer and feminist inquiries into areas of bio-science, science fiction, and animal studies. Her works have been shown in festivals, galleries and museums, including the Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Lincoln Center, Exit Art (NYC), the Science Gallery, (Dublin), NGBK, (Berlin), MASS MoCA (North Adams), Videotage Art Space, Para-Site Gallery (Hong Kong), among others. She has received awards for her works including fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2010), the Rockefeller Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

http://kathyhigh.com

Ellie Irons

Ellie Irons is an interdisciplinary artist exploring the interplay of humanity and ecology through drawings, environmental sculpture, and electronic media.  Born in rural Northern California, she went to college in Los Angeles to study art and environmental science. Ellie relocated to New York City in 2005, and completed an MFA at Hunter College in fall 2009.

http://ellieirons.com

Ellen D. Jorgensen

Ellen is passionate about increasing science literacy in both student and adult populations, particularly in the areas of molecular and synthetic biology. She teaches courses and workshops in molecular and synthetic biology for the general public at Genspace, and is involved in numerous collaborations with educational outreach organizations aimed at developing and implementing better science education at the middle school, high school, and undergraduate level. Dr. Jorgensen received her Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the Sackler Institute at New York University School of Medicine in 1987, and went on to continue her research in protein structure/function at SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn. She is presently an adjunct faculty member at New York Medical College. Her latest project is to DNA barcode the plants of the Alaskan tundra.

http://genspace.org

Oliver Medvedik

Open source synthetic biologist and co-founder of Genspace, a first of its kind community biolab, Oliver Medvedik earned his Ph.D. at Harvard Medical School, in the Biomedical and Biological Sciences program.  As part of his doctoral work he has used single-celled budding yeast as a model system to map the genetic pathways that underlie the processes of aging in more complex organisms, such as humans. Prior to arriving in Boston for his doctoral studies, he has lived most of his life in New York City.  He obtained his bachelor’s degree in biology from Hunter College, City University of New York. Since graduating from Harvard, he has worked as a biotechnology consultant, taught molecular biology to numerous undergraduates at Harvard University and mentored two of Harvard’s teams for the international genetically engineered machines competition (IGEM) held annually at M.I.T.

http://genspace.org

Arthur I. Miller

Arthur I. Miller is Emeritus Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College London.[1] He took a PhD in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 1991 to 2005 he was Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College London, where he founded the Department of Science & Technology Studies.

Marta de Menezes

Marta de Menezes is a Portuguese artist with a degree in Fine Arts by the University in Lisbon, a MSt in History of Art and Visual Culture by the University of Oxford, and a PhD candidate at the University of Leiden. Her work has been presented internationally in exhibitions, articles and lectures. She is currently the artistic director of Ectopia, an experimental art laboratory within a biological research institute – the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência – in Lisbon, and Director of Cultivamos Cultura in the South of Portugal.

http://martademenezes.com/

William Myers

William Myers teaches, writes and gives public lectures about the history of architecture and design. He is currently based in Amsterdam and is curating an exhibition at The New Institue in Rotterdam on Biodesign. William has worked for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Hunter College and Genspace, the first community biotech laboratory in the United States. His work has appeared in Domus Magazine, Metropolis Magazine, The Architect’s Newspaper, New York Magazine, Next American City Magazine. William is a graduate of the MFA program in Design Criticism at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

http://www.william-myers.com/

Boryana Rossa

Boryana Rossa is an interdisciplinary artist and curator who works in the fields of electronic arts, film, video, performance and photography. Most of Rossa’s performances and other works have been shown internationally at venues such as steirischer herbst, Graz; National Gallery of Fine Arts, Sofia; 1st Balkan Biennale, Thesaloniki; Kunstwerke and Akademie der Kunste, Berlin; The 1st and 2nd Moscow Biennial For Contemporary Art; Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum, NY; Museum of Contemporary Art (MUMOK) Vienna; Zacheta Gallery, Warsaw; Sofia City Art Gallery;  Institute of Contemporary Art, Sofia; Exit Art, NY, Sofia Arsenal – Museum of Contemporary Art (SAMCA), Sofia.

http://boryanarossa.com

 

Jill Scott

Prof. Dr. Jill Scott is Professor for Art and Science in the Institute Cultural Studies in the Arts, at the Zurich University of the Arts (ZhdK) in Zürich and Founder of the Artists-in-Labs Program, which places artists from all disciplines into physics, computer, engineering and life science labs to learn about scientific research and make creative interpretations. She is also Vice Director of the Z-Node PHD program on art and science at the University of Plymouth, UK. Her recent publications include: Neuromedia: Art and Science Research together with Esther Stöckli, The Transdiscourse book series: Volume 1: Mediated Environments, 2011, Artists-in-labs: Networking in the Margins, 2011 and Artists-in-labs:  Processes of Inquiry: 2006 Springer/Vienna/New York.

Victoria Vesna

Victoria Vesna, Ph.D., is a media artist and Professor at the UCLA Department of Design | Media Arts and Director of the Art|Sci center at the School of the Arts and California Nanosystems Institute (CNSI). She is currently a senior researcher at IMéRA – Institut Méditerranéen de Recherches Avancées in Marseille (2011-2013).  Victoria has exhibited her work in over twenty solo exhibitions, more than seventy group shows, has been published in excess of twenty papers and gave 100+ invited talks in the last decade. She is the North American editor of AI & Society and in 2007 published an edited volume – Database Aesthetics: Art in the age of Information Overflow, Minnesota Press and most recently an edited volume entitled Context Providers: Conditions of Meaning in Media Arts. (co-edited with Christiane Paul and Margot Lovejoy). Intellect Press, 2011.

http://victoriavesna.com

Jennifer Willet

Dr. Jennifer Willet is an internationally successful artist in the emerging field of BioArt. From 2000-2007 Willet and Shawn Bailey collaborated on an innovative computational, biological, artistic, project called BIOTEKNICA.  At the same time, she taught in the Studio Arts Department at Concordia University, and completed her PhD in the Interdisciplinary Humanities Program at the same institution.  Willet also taught “BioArt: Contemporary Art and the Life Sciences” for The Art and Genomics Centre at The University of Leiden in 2008, and now works as an Assistant Professor in the School of Visual Arts, at The University of Windsor.  In 2009 she opened the first biological art lab in Canada, called INCUBATOR: Hybrid Laboratory at the Intersection of Art, Science, and Ecology at the UofW.  In July 2011 she completed BioARTCAMP, a project that involved hosting 20 artists, scientists and students at The Banff Centre, where they built a portable bioart laboratory and conducted experiments in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

http://www.jenniferwillet.com

Collections

  • Plant Collection
    Including foliage, carnivorous plants, moss and cacti
  • Specimen Collection
    Cleared, stained and preserved collection of various specimens
  • Skull Collection
    3 full-scale resin human skeletons, ape skeleton
  • Aquariums: Freshwater
    Community tank of fish and xenopus frogs
  • Aquariums: Saltwater
    Community tank with starfish, coral, sea snails, hermit crabs

Microscopes

  • 4x Proscope HR
    Bodelin PS-HR-50x Digital Proscope W/50X Lens
  • 2x Proscope Mobile
    Bodelin
  • 4x Advanced Upright/Compound Microscope
    Motic BA310 Biological Microscope
  • Inverted Microscope
    Motic AE2000
  • 6x Stereo/Dissecting Microscope
    Motic SMZ168 Stereo Zoom Microscope
  • Wide-Field Epi-Fluorescent Microscope
    Amscope FM690TC
SVA Digital Lab

Imaging

  • 4x Canon EOS 5D Mark II Cameras
  • Canon Vixia Video Camera
    HF S30 W/AVC-HD CMOS
  • 4x Porta-Trace Light-Boxes
    16 Watt, Model #1012; Gagne, Inc.
  • ProgRes CF Scan
    Jenoptik
  • 4x Time Lapse Camera 8.0
    Wingscapes 8.0
  • Pocket Projector
    Optoma

Incubation & Mixing

  • 3x Incubators
    Quincy Lab General Purpose Incubator, Model 12-140
  • Vortex Mixer
    Edvotek Tornado Vortexer 5023
  • Magnetic Stirrer Hotplate
    Corning 5x7inch PC-420D
  • Shaking Incubator
    Benchmark Incu-Shaker Mini
  • Centrifuge
    Eppendorf F-45-12-11
  • Thermalcycler
    Edvotek EdvoCycler 541
  • Temp. Controlled 6-Liter Water Bath
    Bio-Rad Temp. Controlled Water Bath
  • DNA Quantitator
    Invitrogen Qubit 2.0 Fluorometer 2.0

Sterilization

  • Flow Hood w/ hepafilter
    Laminar Series I Flow Hood
  • Infrared Micro-sterilizer
    Benchmark B1000 BactiZapper
  • Tabletop Autoclave steam-sterilizer
    Tuttnauer
  • FumeHood
    Labconco Protector Laboratory Hood

Measuring

  • Temperature data logger
    Lascar El-USB-1
  • Hand-held pH meter
    RS 232 Meter
  • Triple-Beam Scale
    OHAUS 610gram capacity Triple-Beam Scale
  • Temperature controlled water bath
    Bio-Rad 166-0504
  • Digital Tare-Scale
    Carolina, 300gram capacity, Model=SLB301-US
  • Digital Kitchen Scale
    Eat-Smart Precision Pro
  • M-prove Digital Scale
    Sartorius M-Prove

Other Equipment

  • 2x Automatic Pipettes
    PipetmanKits (P20, P200, P1000)
  • Trans-Illuminator, Non-UV Lightbox for preparative applications→ DNA Capturing
    Technology EmbiTec PrepOne Sapphire
  • Gel-electro-phoresis system
    Evotek 509 EVT300
  • Laminator
    Scotch TL901, 1210019251
  • Dremel
    Model 200
  • Hand-held pH/mV/Temp/RS 232 Meter
    Eutech Instruments Oakton
  • Digital Min/Max Hygro-Thermometer
    Sunleaves Min/Max Hygro-Thermometer
  • Microwave
    Panasonic
  • Flower press / Preservation technique equipment

*Please Note: the lab is equipped with all necessary safety wear, including: lab coats, gloves, protective goggles, hair nets, etc.

From the Laboratory to the Studio: Practices in Bio Art

FID-3437-A
Wednesday 3:00-8:50
Spring semester: 3 studio credits

Instructor: Suzanne Anker

From the decipherment of the human genome to industrialized food production, science has spilled out of the laboratory into our lives. As scientists engage in molecular engineering, the corporeal body and the manipulation of life forms have become a public and aesthetic discourse unto themselves. This course will examine intersections between laboratory practices and visual art production. Projects will employ video microscopes and scanning devices, scientific specimen collections, plant tissue engineering, new anatomical models and molecular cuisine. In addition, each student will design their own terrarium with fish, aquatic plants and/or micro eco-systems. Field trips and guest lecturers will complement course material. Students may work in a variety of media, from drawing and painting to the digital and performing arts.

Prometheus Unbound: An Introduction Bio Art

FID-3432-A
Wednesday 3:00-8:50
Fall semester: 3 studio credits
Instructor: Brandon Ballengée

Humans have tampered with species development for thousands of years, creating countless varieties of domesticated plants and animals. Today, advances in biotechnology allow for the creation of entirely novel life forms such as transgenic rats glowing with jellyfish genes. In this lab/studio course, students will be introduced to the emerging field of biological arts through hands-on laboratory practices, discussions and excursions. Field trips to local pet stores and seafood markets will be conducted to examine post-natural organisms. In the lab/studio, students will create a post-naturalist journal, extract DNA, paint with stained tissues, culture microbial fauna paintings, generate and disperse native seed bombs, and learn proper techniques for preserving vertebrates, among other activities. Topics of discussions will range from bio-ethics to science-fiction/biological reality, and more.

From the Laboratory to the Studio:
Interdisciplinary Practices in Bio Art


Early application (by April 15th) is highly recommended.

Summer semester: May 16-June 16, 2017
Tuition: $3,000
Instructors: Suzanne Anker, Joseph DiGiorgis and visiting speakers.

For further information:
e-mail [email protected]
call 212.592.2188
SVA Summer Residency Courses

From anatomical studies to landscape painting to the biomorphism of surrealism, the biological realm historically provided a significant resource for numerous artists. More recently, Bio Art has become a term referring to intersecting domains of the biological sciences and their incorporation into the plastic arts. Of particular importance in Bio Art is to summon awareness of the ways in which advancing biotechnologies alter social, ethical and cultural values in society.

Artworks by SVA Bio Art Residency alumni

Coming to the fore in the early 1990s, bio art is neither media specific nor locally bounded. It is an international movement with practitioners in such regions as Europe, the U.S., Russia, Asia, Australia and the Americas. Several sub-genres of bio art exist within this overarching term:

  1. Artists who employ the iconography of the 20th- and 21st-century sciences, including molecular and cellular genetics, transgenically altered living matter, reproductive technologies and neurosciences. All traditional media, including painting, sculpture, printmaking and drawing are employed to convey novel ways of representing life forms.
  2. Artists who utilize computer software, systems theory and simulations to investigate aspects of the biological sciences such as evolution, artificial life and robotics through digital sculpture and new media installations.
  3. Artists employing biological matter itself as their medium, including processes such as tissue engineering, plant breeding, transgenics and ecological reclamation.

This interdisciplinary residency will take place in the new SVA Bio Art Laboratory located in the heart of New York City’s Chelsea gallery district. The SVA Bio Art Lab houses microscopes for photo and video, skeletons and specimen collections, a herbarium and an aquarium as well as a library. Each student resident is awarded a private studio space. The residency culminates in a public exhibition.

Demonstrations include microscopy, plant tissue engineering, molecular cuisine and the production of micro ecosystems. Students may work in any media, including the performing arts.

The Residency will be led by artist Suzanne Anker, Chair of the BFA Fine Arts Department at SVA, and Joseph DeGiorgis, marine biologist. In addition, visiting speakers have included artists, scientists and museum professionals including Kathy High, Ingeborg Reichle, James Walsh, Jennifer Willet, Ellen D. Jorgensen, Oliver Medvedik, William Myers and Paula Hayes.

NOTE: A portfolio is required for review and acceptance to this program. Residents who wish to borrow equipment from the Fine Arts Digital Lab are required to submit a refundable security deposit. Participants will be held responsible for payment of any loss, theft or damage incurred to the equipment.

Affordable housing is available, as are opportunities to display work.
This summer residency program grants 4 undergraduate studio credits for those interested. If you are a graduate student, please check with your School for academic credit options.

For further information or questions regarding SVA’s Summer Residencies
e-mail [email protected] or call 212.592.2188.